Nominate someone for an Honour

If you know someone who has made a significant difference in their community or field of work or who has achieved great things against the odds, then please consider nominating them for an honour.

Click here to visit the British Government website to nominate someone for an honour >

How to complete the nomination form

Types of Honours

Close up image of an oval badge topped with a crown, attached to a red riband with gold-edging. The oval surround is blue with the words 'In Action Faithful In Honour Clear' and surrounds a silver rectangular engraving of a person on horseback next to a tree containing a shield with a crest.
The Companion of Honour is a special award granted to those who have made a major contribution to the arts, science, medicine, or government lasting over a long period of time. The members, of which there are 65 at any one time, currently include actress Dame Maggie Smith, Lord Coe, Stephen Hawking, John Major and Desmond Tutu. Sometimes regarded as a junior class of the Order of Merit (see here), the Order of the Companions of Honour was founded by George V in 1917 to recognise services of national importance. Non-British nationals, including Commonwealth figures, can be honorary members of the Order, and count as additional to the main 65. Very few people receive both the Order of Merit and the Companion of Honour, but these have included Sir Winston Churchill and Sir David Attenborough. Motto: "In action faithful and in honour clear" Ranks and Post-nominals: Member (CH)

Companion of Honour

This is awarded for having a major contribution to the arts, science, medicine, or government lasting over a long period of time.

Knight or Dame

This is awarded for having a major contribution in any activity, usually at national level. Other people working in the nominee’s area will see their contribution as inspirational and significant, requiring commitment over a long period of time.

Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)

This is awarded for having a prominent but lesser role at national level, or a leading role at regional level. You can also get one for a distinguished, innovative contribution to any area.

Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE)

This is awarded for having a major local role in any activity, including people whose work has made them known nationally in their chosen area.

Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)

Awarded for an outstanding achievement or service to the community. This will have had a long-term, significant impact and stand out as an example to others.

British Empire Medal (BEM)

Awarded for a ‘hands-on’ service to the local community. This could be a long-term charitable or voluntary activity, or innovative work of a relatively short duration (3 to 4 years) that has made a significant difference.

The UK Honours System

The honours system in the UK is designed to recognise people and who make a real difference to their community or in their field of work.

 

The Lord-Lieutenant very much wants to encourage more nominations from all communities in Essex to identify those individuals who would be worthy of receiving an honour, particularly from areas where people have not previously been recognised.

Honours are given to people for sporting or other major national achievements but many more honours are awarded to those who don’t make the headlines. An honour can recognise the achievements of ordinary people who do extraordinary things but they must still be actively involved in what you’re nominating them for. Anyone can nominate anyone for an honour but, importantly, you must not tell them.

 

You can find a nomination form here. It’s not difficult to complete but you will need at least two letters of support to back up your nomination and these should be from people who know the nominee personally.

 

For individuals, honours can be awarded for achievements such as:

– making a difference to their community or field of work
– enhancing Britain’s reputation
– long-term voluntary service
– innovation and entrepreneurship
– changing things, with an emphasis on achievement
– improving life for people less able to help themselves
– displaying moral courage

 

Honours are given to those involved in:

– community, voluntary and local services
– arts and media
– health
– sport
– education
– science and technology
– business and the economy
– civil or political service

 

Honours lists are published twice a year – at New Year and on the Queen’s official birthday in mid-June.

If you know someone who has made a significant difference in their community or field of work or who has achieved great things against the odds, then please consider nominating them for an honour.

Click here to visit the British Government website to nominate someone for an honour >